Covid 19 Phase 2 Health Protection Protocols

Masks

  • All people entering the dojo must wear a cloth mask that covers your nose and mouth as per Thurston county health regulations.

Monitoring Health

  • We ask you to monitor your health at home and not come to the dojo if you have a temperature or feel ill.
  • When entering the dojo, all participants will have their temperature taken (we have a no-touch thermometer).
  • With this new challenge we ask everyone to attend to their own health and consider how they care for others.

Maintaining Health at the Dojo and for Our Practice

  • We ask everyone to use hand sanitizer upon arrival at the dojo and periodically during classes as needed. 
  • Classes will be no touch. Six-foot spacing (two mat squares) between participants will be maintained during classes. Aikido exercises and kata, Jo, bokken, ‘shadow’ techniques, slow individual Aikido movements, and Taiji will be shared.
  • Dressing rooms will be closed. Please come dressed to do Aikido.
  • Please bring your own water bottle. The water dispenser will be closed.
  • We will attempt to hold classes outdoors as much as possible depending on the weather. Classes held outside will meet at the dojo and walk to the park at Capitol Lake.

Dojo Cleaning

  • We are cleaning the dojo after each class with anti-viral solutions. Doors will be open as much as possible to provide fresh air.

Aikido Olympia Dojo reopening!

Hello Aikidoka,

We have missed you all very much and are excited to begin offering classes again. During stage 2 reopening, class size is limited to 5 students. These classes are only available to current members (no new students at this time).

We are using Eventbrite to manage registration for these classes. We have sent info on how to register for these classes to our member email list.  If you are a current member and have not been receiving email up dates from us, contact us through info@aikidoolympia.com or the Contact Us page and we will send you a link to register.

We look forward to being with you, training with you, and supporting you in your Aikido practice through this next phase.

National Preparedness Month and Aikido

This September is National Preparedness Month. And as I’m writing this, I ‘m heading to Texas to support the national response to Hurricane Harvey. This month focuses on planning for the small and the large disasters, with an overarching theme “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can.”

In Budo (Martial Ways) our path is becoming more prepared in many ways- physically, emotionally, and spiritually. This preparedness can be personal and focus on our selves but it is perhaps as important to look at how our individual preparedness increases the overall resilience of our whole community.

We should all take action to prepare! We may be the first first-responders in our community if a disaster occurs. And, by training how to respond during an emergency and what to do when disaster strikes — where we live, work, and train –  we can model the Budo in our community, making it healthier, safer, and more resilient when disasters happen.

Aikido in Daily Life – September 2017

We come to our dojo to train so that we’re better able to apply the principles of Aikido in our daily lives.

By Nate Weed

I frequently think about how I can better apply what I learn in my aikido training to my daily life but, in all honesty, I really train in aikido because it helps me be a better emergency manager and first responder. In fact, I know many first responders who train in martial arts and for many different reasons. Often it is because these roles can put responders at greater risk of experiencing violence than the average person and it is believed that through martial arts training, one will develop the skills to deal with that violence. As a leader of responders, I find that my risk of encountering a violent situation is probably even lower than the average persons and yet I still study martial arts every day. The key elements that I can apply to my profession are not the techniques used to restrain a person or throw a person but much more the skills to regain my center during a “crucial conversation,” or the ability to extend positive ki energy when faced with a deteriorating situation with lives at stake, or the ability to just model grit. For me, these are not the skills that I’ve developed through learning the beautiful throws, or elegant joint locks and pins used in aikido. Rather these are the skills one learns when being thrown repeatedly- perhaps even beyond the point where you just don’t think you can take another fall. It is through the study of ukemi that real-life leadership skills are learned.